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Episode 3.8: Zama

In by Barry Strauss

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It’s hardly a household word today, but Zama decided the fate of Rome. Join us for the epic battle of two titans, Hannibal and Scipio.

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Episode 3.7: Cannae

In by Barry Strauss

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Hannibal’s victory at Cannae was one of the most dramatic in history yet ultimately one of the least fruitful. Here’s how it happened.

Episode 6: Hannibal

In by Barry Strauss

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Episode 6: Hannibal
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Would you die for a leader who seemed to be Mars himself: the god of war come down to earth? That was the question for the followers of Hannibal.

Radio and Review Roundup

“absolutely first rate” — G. Gordon Liddy For the podcast of my interview, see http://www.blubrry.com/ggliddy/1382289/masters-of-command/   “In all, Strauss weaves a glorious tapestry with many vignettes featuring each of the three commanders….he compares the three in ways that are not all immediately obvious, drawing on a fully stocked supply of anecdotes and details.” — about.com http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/warfareconflictarmor/a/501123-Review-Strauss-Masters-of-Command.htm?r=et  

Hannibal on Leadership

In the run-up to the publication of Masters of Command on Tuesday, I’ll ask each of the book’s three masters for the lessons of his leadership. Yesterday I interviewed the ghost of Alexander the Great. Today I speak to the shade of Hannibal. Good morning, Son of Hamilcar. What makes you a greater leader than Alexander or Julius Caesar? “Both …

P-DAY is coming

May Day. Visions of country folk dancing around the May Pole. Of labor unionists marching behind raised banners. Of student rebels scuttling across Parisian cobblestones in ’68. Of Soviet era Politburoniks lining up above Lenin’s Tomb to salute the latest weaponry rolling across Red Square. And this year, I’m dreaming of a new May Day. It’s D-Day! Er, make that …

Hannibal’s Path: is War Coming in the Middle East?

His bearded face had a weather-beaten look. His one good eye stared in scrutiny beside an aquiline nose. A man in his 60s, he still looked strong and unbowed–for a ghost. He was the shield of Carthage, the avatar of Hercules, the symbol of the one-eyed Celtic war god, the counselor of kings, the idol of the Army, and the …